The Best Pediatric Specialty Care
Out There, is Right Here.

 

   

Conditions We Treat

What is a Colonoscopy?
Colonoscopy Instructions

Clean Out Colonoscopy
Ages 3-5

Clean Out Colonoscopy
Ages 6-11

Clean Out Colonoscopy
Ages 12 and older

Other Information

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)

Helpful Hints for Controlling Gas (Flatus)

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

GI Conditions Treated

Abdominal Pain
Abdominal pain is pain that you feel anywhere between your chest and groin. This is often referred to as the stomach region or belly.

Achalasia
Achalasia is a disorder of the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach (esophagus), which affects the ability of the esophagus to move food toward the stomach.

Biliary atresia
Biliary atresia is a blockage in the tubes (ducts) that carry a liquid called bile from the liver to the gallbladder

Intestinal pseudo-obstruction
Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a condition in which there are symptoms of intestinal blockage without any physical blockage.

Constipation
Constipation is most often defined as having a bowel movement less than 3 times per week. It usually is associated with hard stools or difficulty passing stools. You may have pain while passing stools or may be unable to have a bowel movement after straining or pushing for more than 10 minutes.

Crohn's disease
Crohn's disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It usually affects the intestines, but may occur anywhere from the mouth to the end of the rectum (anus). Ulcerative colitis is a related condition.

Encopresis
Encopresis is the voluntary or involuntary passage of stools in a child who has been toilet trained (typically over age 4), which causes the soiling of clothes.

Esophageal Spasm
are painful muscle contractions that affect your esophagus, the hollow tube between your throat and your stomach.

Esophagitis
Esophagitis is a general term for any inflammation, irritation, or swelling of the esophagus, the tube that leads from the back of the mouth to the stomach.

Failure to Thrive
Failure to thrive refers to children whose current weight or rate of weight gain is significantly lower than that of other children of similar age and gender.

Feeding Disorders
A feeding disorder in infancy or early childhood is a child's refusal to eat certain food groups, textures, solids or liquids for a period of at least one month, which causes them to not gain enough weight or grow naturally. Feeding disorders resemble failure to thrive, except that in feeding disorder there is no medical or physiological condition that can explain the very small amount of food the children consume or their lack of growth.

Food Allergy
A food allergy is an exaggerated immune response triggered by eggs, peanuts, milk, or some other specific food.

Foreign Body Removal
The treatment for a foreign body involves removing the object. The ease or difficulty of this process depends on where in the body the object is.

Gas – Flatulence
is the state of having excessive stomach or intestinal gas. This can result in uncomfortable feelings of bloating, as well as increased belching (burping) or passing of gas from the rectum.

Gastroesophageal Reflux
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the esophagus (the tube from the mouth to the stomach). This action can irritate the esophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms.

Gastroparesis
Gastroparesis is a condition that reduces the ability of the stomach to empty its contents. It does not involve a blockage (obstruction).

Gastroschisis
Gastroschisis is a birth defect in which an infant's intestines stick out of the body through a defect on one side of the umbilical cord.

GI Bleeding
Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding refers to any bleeding that starts in the gastrointestinal tract.Bleeding may come from any site along the GI tract, but is often divided into:
Upper GI bleeding: The upper GI tract includes the esophagus (the tube from the mouth to the stomach), stomach, and first part of the small intestine.
Lower GI bleeding: The lower GI tract includes much of the small intestine, large intestine or bowels, rectum, and anus.

H. pylori
Helicobacter pylori, previously named Campylobacter pylori, is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach, and may be present in other parts of the body, such as the eye.

Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C is a viral disease that leads to swelling (inflammation) of the liver. Other types of viral hepatitis include: Hepatitis A; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis D.

Hirschsprung Disease
Hirschsprung's disease is a blockage of the large intestine due to improper muscle movement in the bowel. It is a congenital condition, which means it is present from birth.

Imperforate Anus
Imperforate anus is a defect that is present from birth (congenital). The opening to the anus is missing or blocked. The anus is the opening to the rectum through which stools leave the body.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves chronic inflammation of all or part of your digestive tract. IBD primarily includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Both usually involve severe diarrhea, pain, fatigue and weight loss. IBD can be debilitating and sometimes leads to life-threatening complications.

Lactose Intolerance
Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Lactose intolerance develops when the small intestine does not make enough of an enzyme called lactase. The body needs this enzyme to digest lactose.

Liver Disease
The term "liver disease" applies to many diseases and disorders that cause the liver to function improperly or stop functioning. Abdominal pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice), or abnormal results of liver function tests suggest you have liver disease.

Lower GI Bleeding
Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, commonly abbreviated LGIB, refers to any form of bleeding in the lower gastrointestinal tract.

Meckels Diverticulum
A Meckel's diverticulum is a pouch on the wall of the lower part of the intestine that is present at birth (congenital). The diverticulum may contain tissue that is the same as tissue of the stomach or pancreas.

Omphalocele
An omphalocele is a birth defect in which the infant's intestine or other abdominal organs stick out of the belly button (navel). In babies with an omphalocele, the intestines are covered only by a thin layer of tissue and can be easily seen. An omphalocele is a type of hernia.

Painful Swallowing
Swallowing pain is any pain or discomfort while swallowing. You may feel it high in the neck or lower down behind the breastbone. Most often, the pain feels like a strong sensation of squeezing or burning. Swallowing pain may be a symptom of a serious disorder.

Pancreatitis
Pancreatitis is defined as inflammation of the pancreas. It has several causes and symptoms and requires immediate medical attention. It occurs when pancreatic enzymes (especially trypsin) that digest food are activated in the pancreas instead of the small intestine. It may be acute—beginning suddenly and lasting a few days, or chronic—occurring over many years.

Persistent Diarrhea & Malabsorption
Diarrhea occurs commonly in both children and adults. Diarrhea lasting less than seven days is considered acute. The majority of diarrheal episodes fall into this category. Diarrhea lasting more than 7 days is defined as persistent, while diarrhea for more than 30 days is chronic. Malabsorption is the body's inability to use the food that it takes in, often causing diarrhea.

Polyposis
Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited condition in which numerous adenomatous polyps form mainly in the epithelium of the large intestine.

Rumination Syndrome
Rumination syndrome, or Merycism, is an under-diagnosed chronic Motility Disorder characterized by effortless regurgitation of most meals following consumption, due to the involuntary contraction of the muscles around the abdomen.

Short Bowel Syndrome
Short bowel syndrome is a condition in which nutrients are not properly absorbed (malabsorption) because a large part of the small intestine is missing or has been surgically removed.

Swallowing Disorders
Difficulty with swallowing is the sensation that food is stuck in the throat, or from the neck down to just above the abdomen behind the breastbone (sternum).

Ulcerative Colitis
Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects the lining of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Crohn's disease is a related condition.

Upper GI Bleeding
Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (sometimes upper GI or UGI bleed or hemorrhage) refers to bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, commonly defined as bleeding arising from the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum.

 

 

Neonatal Care

Coastal Carolina Neonatology

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

Neonatal Transport

NICU Family Resources

NICU Follow-Up Clinic

Pediatrics

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

Pediatric Inpatient & Newborn Services

Nunnelee Pediatric Specialty Clinics

Resources

Betty H. Cameron Women's and
Children's Hospital

INFANTS

NHRMC

NHRMC Foundation

NICU Family Resources

SEAHEC

VON

2212 South 17th St. | Wilmington, NC 28401
p: (910) 667-2970 f: (910) 667-7390